prithi gowda

The Method: Scrambled Eggs

prithi gowda
The Method: Scrambled Eggs

My mother was raised in France, but surprisingly really does not feel at home in the kitchen. I frequently joke around and give her a hard time about her lack of cooking skills to which she responds that she can make a really good pot of soft- scrambled eggs. And that is true. The one thing that she has mastered in the kitchen, she can make extraordinarily well. To the point where her scrambled eggs are by far some of the best I’ve ever had.
After years of passing her the wooden spoon and marveling at her delectable plates of consistently creamy eggs, I finally took her method to the stove and gave it my own try.

The key is temperature and time. The heat at which you cook the eggs and the focus and time that you put into them are what set apart an average scramble and a true plate of french eggs. For starters, you need a nice pot. Not a frying pan or a skillet but rather a deep pot. Secondly, it is absolutely paramount that you whisk the eggs incredibly well, the yolks and the whites should come together to form a uniform color and texture. Next, The heat needs to be so incredibly low, low to the point where you can barely see the flame. Add a dab of butter, and pour your eggs into the pot. The second the eggs hit the pot you have to start frantically stirring. You don’t want to give the eggs the opportunity to fry at the bottom. Instead, they should slowly thicken cooking evenly instead of scorching. Continue whisking until the eggs are creamy and thick, you may have to turn down the heat if the eggs are cooking too quickly. Just before the eggs are done, turn off the heat and continue stirring until desired texture (should be creamy, and not too lumpy). Finish with chopped chives, cracked black pepper and maldon sea salt. You can add a dollop of creme fraiche and serve eggs with some crusty grilled bread. 
Xo,
Romilly